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Celebrate Louisiana & Cajuns with this jambalaya of entertaining and educational

Louisiana History

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William C. C. Claiborne William Charles Cole Claiborne was born in 1775 in Sussex County, Virginia and eventually bec...

William C. C. Claiborne

The Germans in Louisiana I wonder how many Louisiana natives and visitors have searched for the German Coast along the...

The Germans in Louisiana

Baroness Pontalba So many of us, beginning as young children, have walked through Jackson Square in the French ...

Baroness Pontalba

Nottoway Plantation Sitting only 200′ from the banks of the Mississippi River just north of White Castle, Louisian...

Nottoway Plantation

HUEY LONG (1893-1935) Huey Pierce Long was perhaps the most controversial and colorful state governor in US history. ...

HUEY LONG (1893-1935)

THE TABASCO STORY In 1841a fourth generation American of Scottish-Irish descent moved to New Orleans to begin a...

THE TABASCO STORY

Houmas Indian Tribe The year was 1686 when French explorer Robert LaSalle led his expedition down the Mississippi t...

Houmas Indian Tribe

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Claudia's Corn Soup

6 slices bacon 1 pound smoked sausage, diced ½ cup pickled pork or any ham seasoning 2 large white onions, finely chopped 3 stalks...

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Manale's BBQ Shrimp

One of our favorite recipes to prepare for friends and family is the barbecued shrimp recipe obtained by my mother (over 40 years...

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Oysters Mosca

Johnny Adapted from dish made famous by Manale’s and Mosca’s restaurants- of New Orleans 4 dozen oysters and liquid 1 large...

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Spinach-Artichoke Dip

Missy Replicated from Houston’s Restaurant’s (Metairie, LA) popular appetizer 2 sticks butter 1 medium white onion, finely...

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Marcia Ball

An energetic combination of blues and honky-tonk with a touch of boogie woogie best describes this Louisiana native who has been...

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New Orleans Street Cars

New Orleans became the second American city to have streetcars in 1835. The first city to introduce these horse-driven train cars...

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Atchafalaya Basin

The largest swamp wilderness in the United States; an area comprising nearly 600,000 acres encompasses most of Cajun Country in...

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Natchitoches Meat Pies

Natchitoches (Nack’-uh-tish) has long been revered as one of the most desired family destinations in Louisiana. It’s quaint...

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Oysters Mosca

Johnny Adapted from dish made famous by Manale’s and Mosca’s restaurants- of New Orleans 4 dozen oysters and liquid 1 large...

Image
Manale's BBQ Shrimp

One of our favorite recipes to prepare for friends and family is the barbecued shrimp recipe obtained by my mother (over 40 years...

Image
Spinach-Artichoke Dip

Missy Replicated from Houston’s Restaurant’s (Metairie, LA) popular appetizer 2 sticks butter 1 medium white onion, finely...

Image
Natchitoches Meat Pies

Natchitoches (Nack’-uh-tish) has long been revered as one of the most desired family destinations in Louisiana. It’s quaint...

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Gene Rizzo

Gene Rizzo, South LA native, architect, successful artist

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Cooking Louisiana

Cooking Louisiana. Excellent site for finding best dining in New Orleans area

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Louisiana Hot Stuff

Louisiana Hot Stuff. Unique Louisiana gifts in Lafayette, LA

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Louisiana Cookin'

Magazine covering authentic recipes, tasty travels and unique cultures of Louisiana.

William Charles Cole Claiborne was born in 1775 in Sussex County, Virginia and eventually became Louisiana’s first elected governor in 1812. His father was Colonel William Claiborne who was descended from a distinguished Westmoreland Country, England family. William C.C. also had a brother named Nathaniel who served as a member of Congress from Virginia for 20 years.

He briefly attended William and Mary College in Richmond before clerking in the US House of Representatives while studying law and, through his association with John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and John Sevier, moved to Tennessee to open his first law practice. While in Tennessee he helped write the state constitution.

In 1797 he resigned a position on the Tennessee State Supreme Court to run for the US House of Representatives. Because of his assistance in support of Thomas Jefferson during the disputed presidential election of 1804, Claiborne was selected to serve as governor of the Louisiana Territory, which was known then as the Mississippi Territory.

In the spring of 1802, Claiborne became increasingly concerned over a Spanish insurrection during the American occupation; and was able to convince the US to send soldiers to help defend New Orleans from a possible insurrection.

While serving in New Orleans he lead the suppression of a slave revolt near what is now LaPlace, Louisiana. He also pushed legislation to require that all state business be conducted in both French and English. This law meant with the approval of his American Creole population who did not speak French.

In 1812 Claiborne won Louisiana’s gubernatorial election by defeating Jacques Villere by a popular vote of 3,707 to 1,947.

During his term as governor he was often criticized for his apparent acceptance of the activities of the pirate Jean Lafitte. At one point, Claiborne authorized the posting of a $500 reward for Lafitte’s capture, only to be humiliated as Lafitte offered $15,000 for the governor’s life!

In 1805, records indicate that Claiborne’s home was at the corner of Levee (not Decatur) and Toulouse in what is now the Government House. Not uncommon in the early 19th Century was the settling of disputes between gentlemen by a duel. Such an event took place in 1807 when one Daniel Clark severely wounded the governor in the thigh. The duel took place in a location somewhere in West Florida (in the Florida parishes of today).

His death at age 42 in 1817 ended a notable term for Louisiana’s first governor. He was buried in St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 and later his remains were relocated to Metairie Cemetery. His grave site along with many other famous Louisianans is included in most cemetery tours departing the French Quarter.

Lindy Boggs, widow of US Representative Hale Boggs, is the great-great-great grandniece of Governor Claiborne. Lindy served as Louisiana’s 2nd District US Representative fro 1973 through 1991 when she was appointed as US Ambassador to the Vatican. Lindy is the mother of NPR reporter and commentator Cokie Roberts.

 

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Joie de vivre (joy of living) characterizes the Cajun way of life. Through their food, music, and festivals, every gathering of family and friends becomes a celebration of heritage.  The rich traditions are embraced by Cajuns and visitors alike.Lassez les bon temps roule' (let the good times roll)!

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