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Celebrate Louisiana & Cajuns with this jambalaya of entertaining and educational

Louisiana History

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William C. C. Claiborne William Charles Cole Claiborne was born in 1775 in Sussex County, Virginia and eventually bec...

William C. C. Claiborne

The Germans in Louisiana I wonder how many Louisiana natives and visitors have searched for the German Coast along the...

The Germans in Louisiana

Baroness Pontalba So many of us, beginning as young children, have walked through Jackson Square in the French ...

Baroness Pontalba

Nottoway Plantation Sitting only 200′ from the banks of the Mississippi River just north of White Castle, Louisian...

Nottoway Plantation

HUEY LONG (1893-1935) Huey Pierce Long was perhaps the most controversial and colorful state governor in US history. ...

HUEY LONG (1893-1935)

THE TABASCO STORY In 1841a fourth generation American of Scottish-Irish descent moved to New Orleans to begin a...

THE TABASCO STORY

Houmas Indian Tribe The year was 1686 when French explorer Robert LaSalle led his expedition down the Mississippi t...

Houmas Indian Tribe

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Claudia's Corn Soup

6 slices bacon 1 pound smoked sausage, diced ½ cup pickled pork or any ham seasoning 2 large white onions, finely chopped 3 stalks...

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Manale's BBQ Shrimp

One of our favorite recipes to prepare for friends and family is the barbecued shrimp recipe obtained by my mother (over 40 years...

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Oysters Mosca

Johnny Adapted from dish made famous by Manale’s and Mosca’s restaurants- of New Orleans 4 dozen oysters and liquid 1 large...

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Spinach-Artichoke Dip

Missy Replicated from Houston’s Restaurant’s (Metairie, LA) popular appetizer 2 sticks butter 1 medium white onion, finely...

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Marcia Ball

An energetic combination of blues and honky-tonk with a touch of boogie woogie best describes this Louisiana native who has been...

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New Orleans Street Cars

New Orleans became the second American city to have streetcars in 1835. The first city to introduce these horse-driven train cars...

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Atchafalaya Basin

The largest swamp wilderness in the United States; an area comprising nearly 600,000 acres encompasses most of Cajun Country in...

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Natchitoches Meat Pies

Natchitoches (Nack’-uh-tish) has long been revered as one of the most desired family destinations in Louisiana. It’s quaint...

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Oysters Mosca

Johnny Adapted from dish made famous by Manale’s and Mosca’s restaurants- of New Orleans 4 dozen oysters and liquid 1 large...

Image
Manale's BBQ Shrimp

One of our favorite recipes to prepare for friends and family is the barbecued shrimp recipe obtained by my mother (over 40 years...

Image
Spinach-Artichoke Dip

Missy Replicated from Houston’s Restaurant’s (Metairie, LA) popular appetizer 2 sticks butter 1 medium white onion, finely...

Image
Natchitoches Meat Pies

Natchitoches (Nack’-uh-tish) has long been revered as one of the most desired family destinations in Louisiana. It’s quaint...

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Gene Rizzo

Gene Rizzo, South LA native, architect, successful artist

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Cooking Louisiana

Cooking Louisiana. Excellent site for finding best dining in New Orleans area

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Louisiana Hot Stuff

Louisiana Hot Stuff. Unique Louisiana gifts in Lafayette, LA

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Louisiana Cookin'

Magazine covering authentic recipes, tasty travels and unique cultures of Louisiana.

New Orleans became the second American city to have streetcars in 1835. The first city to introduce these horse-driven train cars was San Francisco. These early means of public transportation in New Orleans featured one to three horses driven by an operator who controlled the reins and brake. A second man was located at the back of the car and it was his responsibility to assist passengers on and off the car, collect fares, and signal the driver when to proceed. This second crew member was known as the conductor.

The most historic and perhaps best known of the New Orleans line are the St. Charles Avenue street cars which run from Canal Street downtown through what is known as the American Sector (down St. Charles Avenue past Loyola and Tulane Universities and Audubon Park) and up Carrollton until reversing at Claiborne Avenue and retracing the route.

The Riverfront Line is the second set of cars which traverse from Esplanade Avenue at the rear of the French Quarter and along the Mississippi to the Ernest Morial Convention Center. These cars are red in color as opposed the St. Charles Line which are green.

The third line is the Canal Street Line which runs from the foot of Canal Street at the Mississippi River; then along Canal through the Carrollton intersection on to City Park Avenue at the cemeteries. A leg of this line also continues over to the New Orleans City Park and the New Orleans Museum of Art from the Canal-Carrollton intersection.

The price of a ticket ($1.25) is sure bargain for those traveling to addresses near the lines. Those visiting New Orleans for the first time or having never ridden the street cars can enjoy a very comfortable ride through some very picturesque areas. There are all-day passes which enable one to get on and off as many times desired for only $5.00 during a 24-hour period.

Stops are located every few blocks and you can expect another passing car every 5 minutes. Pickup locations are identified with a small yellow, vertical sign reading “Car Stop”. Most passengers enter at the front door and pay the exact change to the driver. When nearing your destination, riders signal the driver to stop by pulling on the overhead wire located above the windows on both sides of the car. Exiting is more convenient through the rear of the car.

Because of tree, electrical wires, and track damages as a result of Hurricane Katrina (2005), the St. Charles Line was not reopened until November, 2007.

The re-dedication of the Canal Street Line took place some years following a decision to discontinue operation in the mid 1960’s due to vehicular traffic and pedestrian congestion on Canal. During that dormant time, there were several community groups along with significant public outcry to successfully return the Canal Street Line to its rightful place within the last few years .

 

About Us

Joie de vivre (joy of living) characterizes the Cajun way of life. Through their food, music, and festivals, every gathering of family and friends becomes a celebration of heritage.  The rich traditions are embraced by Cajuns and visitors alike.Lassez les bon temps roule' (let the good times roll)!

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